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the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
of gasoline as opposed to the producer, and some other hurricanes like katrina and irene before, they've hit an area that has been a big producer of oil, whereas really, in the northeast, they are the consumers of all of that gasoline, and so demand has dropped, but the supply hasn't really dropped as much. > > so the demand is dropping, especially as people are stuck home and not going to offices for instance. > > right. flights are canceled, and people are not driving around as you said, so the demand there has dropped, and that, interestingly enough, has pushed some prices in the southeast region down even further because that oil that usually would have gone to the northeast has dropped off a little bit. > > so much of this boils down to what's going on with the refineries. so what do you anticipate there? you know, we think that this is going to be just a temporary shutdown in the northeast region, and that, as i said earlier, we are going to continue to see prices continue to drop, and demand will come back up after the hurricane is through. > > quick predictions now: where do you see
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
evacuations in the past 14 months. the problem is 14 months ago turn hurricane irene, that just perhapses, it does not do the damage everybody predicted. a lot of people that evacuated suffered more with the evacuation centers than those who stayed behind. everybody was worried that people would say, that's the lesson they learned, they're going to stay behind this time. we see a lot of people sticking around. couple of bars are open, they're having hurricane parties. everything isn't so bad right now, but the partyings going to be turning a lot of danger real soon if everybody sticks around tonight. there's no way in or out now. the main highways into this town are now shut down. and police are now using emergency vehicles, four wheel drives, they can't use police cars to get around. and a lot of these veteran officers are telling me if they drive around they're seeing streets flooded they've never seen, even big puddles on and this again, long before the worst of this stuff hits here in new jersey. tony, allison. >> steve, that is extraordinary. as you said, great concern because the wo
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
as washington state. >> memories of hurricane irene last year that left billions in damage have people determined not to get caught offguard. several states have declared emergencies. people are being told to prepare for the worst, possibly five to seven days without power. reporting live in chesapeake bay peek beach, maryland, i'm dannielle leigh, nbc bay area news. >>> could cord blood be used to cure autism? i'm marianne favro. how a cord registry here in the bay area is playing a critical role in new research. >>> the balance of political power at san jose's city hall lays right here in evergreen. i'm danian trujillo. that's up next. >>> decision 2012 now just 11 days away. nationally and locally, the races are coming down to the wire. among the hottest races in the south bay is the fight for the eighth district seat in san jose. this one district could impact the entire city. nbc bay area's damian trujillo joins us in san jose this evening. damian, why is this race so critical? >> reporter: the battle is between incumbent rose herera and her challenger jimmy wynn. herera says this
the last time was in 2011 during hurricane irene. >>> breaking news from prince george's county tonight. police issued an amber alert for three children, all under the age of 5. they were abducted during a car theft at a gas station tonight. darcy spencer is at the scene. darcy? >> reporter: doreen, i was able to confirm within the last several minutes that police have recovered that vehicle. but here's the -- the bizarre twist. they say that the children were not in that car. it was locationed in southeast washington and they say, in fact there are no car seats in the car. they're investigating to try to figure out what exactly did happen here. now we are at the exxon station. this is where the woman called police. but the incident happened just down the street in the 8400 block of central avenue. the mom was apparently pumping gas, at some point, a dodge intrepid pulls pup. suspect got out. jumped into her car taking off with her three children inside the car. now police tell me that she got in the car with a witness to this incident and they tried to chase the car. they lost sight of
be worse than irene, because this storm will hold its strength, back off as usual, and then feed into the winter storm. this is why it's unusual, because everybody is going to be watching it. it is going to look like it is going to go out to sea and then it looks like it will be pulled back towards the west. >> bill: irene was the one where there was so much flooding in the northeast. >> yes, this is going to be flooding rains very strong winds, and with the right angle for place like chesapeake bay, the south shores of long island and even into new york city if it comes in at the right angle. and it could be a worse-case scenario for some of those places. >> bill: i think maryland is probably drawn -- >> yes. >> i have a very important question, wednesday is halloween, and i have two kids at home that are going to freak out -- if they go out. what is going to happen on halloween. >> it will be a weakening storm, but still strong high pressure gusty winds, with the snow starts to fly higherel indications in parts of west virginia and parts of ohio and penn
. irene on the right. and sandy is about twice as large as last year's irene. this year's storm made landfall yesterday. shortly after being downgraded from hurricane status. >>> next week voters -- measure n would add a one-cent per ounce tax on sodas. the no on measure n campaign has spent $2.5 million to blanket live monday -- richmond with billboards at a town hall meeting last night, richmond's mayor says the measure n is a good way to begin the fight against obesity. >> we know that soda is the perfect place because it gets no nutritional value. it's empty calories. >> this tax is gonna equate -- is an aggressive tax that will result in higher grocery bills. >> the no on measure n campaign is funded by the beverage industry. if it passes, richmond could become the first in the country to impose the tax. >>> and giants' fans are beying up world series championship gear. federal agents are warning you make sure what you are buying is legal. the giants' dugout store at the ballpark was busy. they are expecting bigger crowds before and after the parade. the merchandise there, that'
. at the peak of irene. we're dealing with a history making storm. let's take a look at the center. we expect the center to make its way on shore in the next hour or so. so landfall perhaps within the hour. bring you the latest. there is the latest track again. moving west/northwest at 28 miles per hour. again, we think south jersey, around cape may, but we are getting reports that atlantic city is under water. wind gusts again, as we head throughout the evening. wind gusts in excess of 100 miles per hour. hurricane force winds extending 120 miles away from the center of the storm. we're going to feel this up and down the coastline, the worst of storm surge, wind and rain north of where the center makes landfall. kimberly? >> kimberly: thank you. we'll check back with you later in the program. it may hit landfall in this program. let's go to rick leventhal, live in point pleasant, new jersey, where we have seen the conditions deteriorating by the hour. rick? >> we moved off the beach. it was too nasty out there. we moved to the hotel one block from the beach. where the power is now coming on
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
. no doubt about it. you look at hurricane irene, tropical storm irene, the cost to state and local governments of new york was $1.2 billion. that was for recovery and cleanup. clearly this is going to be an economic hit on us. dimensions of which we just don't know yet. >> it's interesting how it impacted with mta shut down and people unable to get into manhattan for example. lower manhattan almost deserted. certainly very few businesses operating and few businesses operating at night. how does that work its way through the economy? >> very significantly. we take for granted the extensive public transportation system we have in the new york city metropolitan area. it's the life blood to our economy. when that life blood is not pumping, it will have a serious impact. it's not just how soon will trains be running but will be repair costs? they will be significant. mta had its own financing troubles particularly with regard to that capital program. they obviously weren't anticipating the kind of damage that this storm has brought. a long-term where we're at with financing for the mta
year, when irene came through here, and at some point, on the island, the bay actually touched the atlantic ocean. now, also reminiscent is what's going on in new york city, and that's that the mass transit has been shut down and we're talking the subways. the buses and the trains there. 5 million people go through their daily, so, really crippling that area, and you saw new york city mayor michael bloom berg and he's saying that the 1.1 million kids and city schools will not be going to class tomorrow. however, the new york stock exchange will be open, harris. >> harris: they're going to run on generators we understand and have electronic voting down on the new york stock exchange and anna kooiman, thank you very much. we're getting your images of the behemoth storm, and this is your point of view. patty shea snapped photos at rudy's inlet at virginia beach. wow. paul blare sending this photo of his brother ben pelted by rain and high winds in virginia bridge. and david d'amico from long port, new jersey, as it's coming up from that area, south of new york. and massive waves c
with these winds. i was out on the beach with irene for over 12 hours and this is about when i felt it. this storm is still a couple hundred miles away and the winds are gusting over 50 miles per hour. the highest surge will come in at about later this evening and go through this evening we will see the surge 6 to 8 feet. look at the atlantic. it is just ramped up, 10 to 12 footers out there. this is low tide. normally on a typical day you would have 150 feet of beach. it's all gone. and as that next high tide comes in we're going to see the worst of the beach erosion, coastal damage. this whole beach area will be rearranged. so far no reports of any significant damage, but some of the areas south of here, the dunes have been eaten by the wave action and some of the local authorities think some of those homes are going to be hit and fall into the atlantic later on tonight. so, it's only going to get worse from here and inland when these winds crank up over 60 hils per hour, d.c., baltimore, philly away from the beaches this afternoon and tonight that's going to shut down power to millions. once we
in the same spot as when hurricane irene hit. >> shepard: how bad is that? >> it can fill up a couple of feet. >> shepard: be careful out there, i know it's going to be a long night because these winds and the rains are scheduled to continue throughout the night. we have the weather loop again. i want to he show you one characteristic that the weather folks didn't anticipate. here is kind of the center of it right as it goes ashore. all the rain is on this side. the back side is almost completely dry. not like a tropical system at all. more like a nor'easter with all of the wetness on this side. can you see it stretches way past cleveland. but up here, not as much rain. tonight, it's wind and sturgeon in new york city as we approach high tide. we're back with with the continuing coverage in three minutes as fox reports live tonight. 'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agit
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
officials it could be weeks, not days, before full power is restored to everyone. >> during hurricane irene restoration took eight days. for hurricane sandy the full restoration may, in fact, take longer. >> to give you a sense of the impact, check out this comparison of what the normal manhattan skyline liked light lack night. how to do it tom cune, the president of the institute. one of the most jarring images is video that made the rounds online about power stations at 14th streit and fdr highway exploding and lighting up the sky in this explosion. all of the lights around it going out. i like at that. i used to live icouple of blocks from there. i know power is still out in my neighborhood. i say that means we're kind of screws for a long time here. is that what that picture suggests to you? >> well, the picture might suggest that. that particular incident wasn't as serious as some of the other situations they have in lower manhattan, which is that water has gotten into the underground equipment. you have to clean out the equipment and get the water out. it's a very, very difficult task
hurricane irene last was 13,000. double the damaged and down power lines. we have utility crews to restore power but in many cases we don't have enough crews who can remove trees and debris. you can hardly drive anywhere on long island without having to detour because a tree is down against a power line. now, the federal government has something called the national forest service. we need the national forest service with personnel and with chain saws to deploy to long island to help remove the downed trees, the debris, get the power lines back up and the electricity flowing. this is a public safety emergency. it's a public health emergency. it's all related to power. and so, we now need to move from search and rescue mission to a power restoration mission. >> have you called fema? have you called other officials to try to get other help as you described? >> i have. i just left a meeting at the federal staging area at republic airport and there's a national forest service representative there. they actually have crews from the national forest service they have been september to long island.
people, customers, without power in new jersey now as after hurricane irene a year ago and gives you a sense of the depth of the problem here. 60% of the state does not have power. and again, it's going to take a while. yes, there is some frustration but i think people are understanding that this is a really severe calamity that hit this place and you can see along the jersey shore places like this, a beach front property, a restaurant obliterated and what president obama and governor christie are seeing as they fly up and down the shoreline. we saw marine one go by in a convoy with helicopters about ten minutes ago and making their rounds. but i don't think a lot of people expect a lot from the federal government in the short term. >> yeah. >> right now people are just trying to deal with their immediate needs, moving in with neighbors, staying with friends. we have heard reports that some utility companies are talking about perhaps turning off water services, for example, because there could be contamination in the system. people are hunkering down and the work is just beginning. i
that to the list of things to do. >> i am being serious. this is very much like irene a couple of years ago but worse than that . we'll be dealing with a hybrid storm and super storm that emerges with a cold tront and hurricane inside of a nor'easter. if that sounds scary, you need to be prepared for the storm. it could be potentially devastating. millions of people will be affected by still a hurricane. we will see tropical storm force win and rain all across the coast of florida and extending 300 miles from the storm.this storm will get bigger. it hugs the coast over the weekend and tuesday, dc, philly and new york. you could see a storm packing winds of 60 or 80 miles per hour for hours and hours . storm surge as well with high tide. this being be an event that we have not seen in our lifetime. gretchen, you need to understand your evacuation route this weekend. >> gretchen: i will be calling up jd, help me find my evacuation route. >> i will help you. >> brian: we'll show up at your door. >> you, too, brian. you live close to the coast. >> brian: one anchor ahead. >> steve: can't yell a
is the main cause of damage and the top cause of damage in hurricane katrina, isaac, irene and it has been the top cause of damage since 1980. that is the first time mine -- munich re, the insurance company, started to look at hurricane related events. look at storm surge. i will see where the deep parts of the flooding will be felt along the eastern seaboard. look at this possible surges surpassing six feet. you will see how much it goes inland. because these are sigh loan force winds. we also have a full moon, high tide will be hitting tonight at around 8:00 p.m. eastern time. melissa: wow. >> that is expected to add two to three inches to the storm's surge. so that's the problem here. so when you add texas, add oklahoma and new mexico and arizona into the circumference of it, the total circumference but the problem is insurance policies tend not to cover flooding. you have to buy a separate insurance policy to cover flooding. that is the thing homeowners and businesses need to owe. melissa: i thought it was separate issue flooding from a hurricane or just looding? >> that is important
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of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
and inland, once it gets inland, this is not just a coastal event and as you remember tropical storm irene caused more damage inland than it did along the coast. this system could dump up it a foot of snow, parts of west virginia, ohio on into pennsylvania. andrea, this one is going to be a massive, massive problem probably for days to come. >> all right, al. thank you. stay safe. dylan dryer will be here with the rest of the nation's forecast in just a few minutes. here's lester. >> all right. hurricane sandy is already impacting the race for the white house. mitt romney and vice president joe biden each canceled planned weekend appearances in virginia. ron mott is in ohio and he's traveling with vice presidential candidate paul ryan. ron, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. as we all know it takes 270 electoral votes to win the white house. 18 votes are up for grabs in ohio and they just may be the most important votes of all. >> hello, nevada! >> reporter: along with the weather churning over the atlantic, president obama and governor mitt romney are whipping up a storm of t
-- just came through philadelphia last year. >> brian: was it irene? >> we're ready for it. >> brian: what i like about this in termination of it's going to be a severe storm, but you've given us lead time of the we've had four days, maybe more to prepare. it's up to personal responsibility. you can only do so much the do you agree? >> that's exactly right. it is up to the people to keep themselves out of harm's way. we ask them to stay off the streets once the winds start, to clean up their backyard so there are no projectiles flying that could harm them and just be prepared for maybe an extended period of time without electricity because as we know, this type of high winds, are going to knockout line, trees will go down, they need to be ready for an extended period of time without electricity. >> steve: i can't talk to you the last time a governor of a state regarding a hurricane, that wasn't along the coast. for the most part, pennsylvania is not a coastal state and yet here you've got this gigantic, historic storm that's wreaking havoc right there in your state of pennsylvania. >> bria
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)